My NaNoWriMo2017 Bullet Journal

Happy Halloween/NaNoWriMo Eve! This is kind of last minute, but I thought I would share five of my favorite NaNoWriMo bullet journal spreads.
*If you are unfamiliar with the bullet journal system, click here for a video that will explain it better than I can.

Unfortunately I can’t show you pretty pictures like most of the bullet journalers on Instagram because all of my spreads are in braille, and the vast majority of you couldn’t read them. However, I will do my best to describe the spreads well enough for you to actually understand what I’m talking about… 🙂

  1. The Monthly Spread:
    This is basically a staple of all bullet journals, not just writing ones. I don’t typically use the monthly spread when I’m planning for a normal month, but I do during November. This is so that I can easily see what weeks are going to be insanely busy and what weeks are going to be basically free. If I’m going to have a crazy week, I make sure to cover for it in the week prior.

  2. The Word Count Tracker:
    This is a table consisting of three columns: day, word count, and damage control. Along the left-hand side, I list the 30 days of November. In the word count column, I write the word count I achieved for that particular day. In the damage control column, I write the number of words that I need to write the next day in order to fix any damage I did the day before.
    The recommended word count per day to win NaNoWriMo is 1667. Although it is possible to win NaNoWriMo by not writing on the week days and doing nothing but writing on the weekends, (I have done this), it is MUCH easier if you stick to a daily goal of somewhere around 1667 words per day. Hence the word count tracker!

  3. The daily spread:
    For me, this spread is literally just a todo list. Basically, these pages consist of checklists of everything I have to do before I can write. Without these pages, I would get completely sucked into NaNoWriMo, and important things like homework and algebra tests would be forgotten.

  4. The Inspiration Spread:
    This page consists of a list of things that inspire me to write my novel. The majority of WriMos, (including myself), tend to get sick of whatever they’re working on half way through the month and move onto a shiny new idea. This is bad, because you will never finish anything if you don’t stick with something. Also, if you were excited enough about an idea to decide to do it for NaNo, it’s probably pretty good, and you should probably stick with it! My inspiration pages usually consist of things like…
    ◦I love my characters!
    ◦My plot is super exciting!
    ◦These characters have a story to tell, and it’s my job to put it on paper.
    ◦The world needs my novel!!!!

  5. The playlist Spread:
    Most of you probably know by now that I make a playlist for everything I start. I can’t rite in silence, and if I’m going to listen to music while writing, it should totally be stuff that pertains to my story! Putting the playlist on shuffle and listening to a few songs is usually enough to get me in the writing zone, but sometimes I need a little extra help to get into the mindset to write certain scenes. So… I list all of the super important scenes that may be tough to write and associate each of them with a song so that I can listen to that song in order to get in the mindset to write that scene.

Beautiful People | Author Writing Process Edition

Beautiful People is a writing link-up created by Cait @ Paper Fury. This month’s topic is your writerly process!


  1. How do you decide which project to work on?
    I always write the thing that I want to read most. Usually this is the project that I’ve thought out the most and at least somewhat outlined, but sometimes it’s a completely new project that I know very little about but already love.

  2. How long does it usually take you to finish a project?
    That depends on the project… I can usually do a short story in a month. Novels take about a year, (with three months of drafting and nine months of cleaning up the mess that I call a draft).

  3. Do you have any routines to put you in the writing mood?
    I always diffuse peppermint oil when I’m writing because it helps me focus, and I usually listen to either my project playlist or nature sounds.

  4. What time of day do you write best?
    Either really late at night or really early in the morning… what is sleep?

  5. Are there any authors you think you have a similar style to?
    Ummm… no. My style is my own, just like every other author’s style is their own. I honestly think that you could give three different authors the same prompt and ask them to write a story, and they would come up with completely different stories because everybody’s brain works differently!

  6. Why did you start writing, and why do you keep writing?
    I started writing because I loved reading and telling stories, and I just never stopped. It’s so much of a habit to write every day now that it feels weird to not write in a day! I’ll keep writing as long as I have stories to tell, and I’ll probably cry if I ever run out of stories!

  7. What’s the hardest thing you’ve written?
    Definitely my Shaman Novel! The number one piece of advice that you’ll hear as a writer is, “Write what you know”. I personally think that this “rule” is idiotic and hardly ever follow it, but it does have a tiny bit of value. When I started writing my Shaman Novel, I stepped off a cliff into the deep blue unknown, and that was the most terrifying moment of my writerly life! It’s one thing to create a magic system, world, characters, plot, and fantastical creatures out of your imagination, but it’s a completely different thing to combine fantasy and psychology when you know absolutely nothing about the psychological disorders at hand! Speaking from hours of experience here… Google is a writer’s best friend!

  8. Is there a project you want to tackle someday but you don’t feel ready yet?
    Nope! Now that I’ve written two drafts of my Shaman Novel, I can write anything!

  9. What writing goals did you make for 2017 and how are they going?
    Uhhhh… I’ll just skip this question! Just kidding… My main goal for 2017 was to have my Shaman Novel ready for beta readers by June, and clearly that did not happen! I have world building woes, ok?! Cut me some slack here! I still gotta name some fictional countries!

  10. Describe your writing process in 3 words or a gif!
    I absolutely positively despise gifs because gif + screen reader = BAD! So… here are my three words: messy, incoherent, somewhat insane. That turned into four words, but I’m calling it good!

Snippet Sunday

Snippet Sunday is a writing meme created by Samantha @ Reed’s Reads & Reviews in which you share a snippet of your current writing project. It’s been forever since I’ve done one of these, but today I bring you the “unofficial official” synopsis for my Shaman Novel. This is the blurb that I’ve posted to my Camp NaNoWriMo profile, but it’s subject to change as I continue to edit the story. I hope to have the book ready for beta readers by June, but in reality it’s probably going to be more like August or September…
Since you guys are following my book/writing blog, I’m assuming you’re all readers, writers, or both. That means you probably know a thing or two about books and their blurbs, so please let me know what you think of mine in the comments! Does this synopsis make you want to read my book? Is there anything you don’t like about it? Any and all feedback is appreciated! 😉


Nico Deverow’s entire life is built on secrets, lies, and blood. His family built their fortune in blood money and poisoned their way to a seat on the Royal Mist Council, but Nico doesn’t belong in that life. Ancient murders, restless spirits, and the uncensored truth in everyone’s auras are all revealed to him through residual layers of energy, and no one can ever know about it. The second sight is a shaman power, and a Deverow with a shaman gift would kill his bloodline’s reputation completely. His mask is flawless as his family name decrees, but underneath he’s shattering. With no one to help him contain his powers, the magical drug called Bliss and the raiser sharp blade of a dagger become his only salvation. But when natural born healer Adam Rachadon discovers his abilities, Nico is given a choice: trust a shaman with a secret his family would kill him for, or refuse his offer of help and continue to live a lie.

Writing Up Wednesday #5 | The Craft of Writing–How do you learn?

Writing Up Wednesday is a writing link-up created by Lizzy @ The Bent Bookworm. This week’s topic is “The craft of writing,” or more specifically, “How do you learn the craft of writing?”


I honestly don’t make a conscious effort to study the writing craft unless I need to research a specific aspect of it for my story. I don’t plan to take professional writing classes, and I usually don’t go out of my way to read writerly text books. Studying the craft is just something that comes naturally to me through reading a wide range of books, writing book reviews, and connecting with other writers via blogging, youTube, and Twitter. I feel like this is more beneficial than making a conscious effort to study the craft because it allows me to take the advice I like and discard the rest without being boxed in by “professional” rules. Also, by filling my social media feeds with writerly stuff, I can actually justify opening Twitter and youTube! 😉
Here’s a quick list of some people that I’ve learned from:

My Favorite Writerly youTubers

Shaelin Bishop
Emma Lederman
The Y.A. Word Nerds
Vivien Reis
Jenna Moreci
Natalia Leigh
Burgess Taylor
Kim Chance
Coffee Reading Writing

Awesome Writerly Bloggers

Shaelin Bishop
Emma Lederman
A Writer’s Path
National Novel Writing Month
Fiction University
Better Novel Project

Writing Up Wednesday #4: Word Cound Woes

Hello, writerly people! I have not blogged in quite a while because… school/life happened. But today I bring you a Writing Up Wednesday Post!
Writing Up Wednesday is a weekly writing meme created by Lizzy @ The Bent Bookworm! This week’s topic is “Word Count Woes!”


If you’re a serious writer, you probably know that word counts are pretty important. Sometimes the word count of your manuscript can make or brake a publishing opportunity! Because of this some writers obsess over the suggested word count guidelines and stick to them religiously, and some writers tend to ignore it entirely. Personally, I am somewhat in the middle.
I like to make sure I stay kind of in the range of the suggested word count for my genre, but I do not let that number define every single move I make. I do set word count goals before I ever start writing, but I don’t force myself to stick to them. Now… The process I use to determine my prewriting word goal gets kinda nerdy, so be prepared!
I like to loosely mold my writing projects around the four act structure, so I try to pick a word count goal that is sort of close to the suggested range for my genre and is also easily divisible by four! Doing this makes it super easy to figure out how long each chunk of the four act structure needs to be, which gives me a few big milestones to hit!
To give you an example, the prewriting word goal for my “Shaman Novel” was 100000 words. That meant that every 25000 words, I needed to start transitioning to the next act. That being said, I exceeded that goal, and that’s totally fine because the story just wasn’t over at 100000 words! The current word count is 142397 words, but that is still subject to change! I am revising this novel for Camp NaNoWriMo, so I’m sure I’ll add some scenes and chop out some others! I expect the final count to round out somewhere around 150000 words, but that number isn’t set in stone either. My end goal is to tell a good story that feels complete, and I’m not going to let a number of words interfere with that as long as it isn’t completely unreasonable for the genre.

My Favorite Writerly Apps

If you’re a newcomer to this blog and you haven’t already figured this out, I’m a self-proclaimed tech nerd as well as a writer and bookworm! I recently cleaned out my iPad, (no one needs 128 apps in their life when they aren’t using 50 of them), and decided to compile a list of the top ten writing apps that got to stay on my home screen. I am using the Mac/IOS versions of everything, but I’m pretty sure some of them have Android and Windows apps as well. Also, if you’re visually impaired, all of these apps are fully accessible with Voiceover! 😉


  1. Scrivener
    Scrivener is literally the best thing that has ever happened to my writing process! It basically lets me have all of the files associated with my WIP right in front of me in the same window! If you’re a writer and you’ve ever had to do a bunch of research for something, you know what it’s like to have multiple Word docs stored in multiple subfolders. It’s not exactly the easiest thing in the world to look at your research info and your writing document at the same time, and when it comes to reorganizing the scenes that you wrote in the wrong order, you’re in for a copy/paste party and lots of scrolling. Scrivener makes all that super easy because you basically get to drag and drop virtual index cards around your screen! It’s kinda hard to explain, but it’s amazing, and you should go download the trial!

  2. Dropbox
    Dropbox keeps your files synced between your phone, tablet, dropbox.com, and the Dropbox folder on your desktop! Also, you can put your Scrivener projects in there, so all your writing syncs with the Scrivener IOS app! If you forced me to pick only two writing apps, Scrivener and Dropbox would be my dream team.

  3. Simplenote
    Simplenote is possibly the easiest text editor I’ve ever used on my phone. All you have to do is open the app, tap the plus button, and start typing. It keeps everything synced in the ever mysterious cloud so you always have it on any device. You can even collaborate on notes by putting someone’s email address in the tag field! It’s kind of like Google Docs, but simpler and way more blind friendly. I put all my random brainstorm notes in Simplenote before I transfer any of them to Scrivener.

  4. Writer Lists
    This app as a list for pretty much anything you could possibly want. I use the name lists all the time, and sometimes I’ll shuffle a random list to get a quick writing prompt. I believe the IOS app costs $3 now, but it is well worth the money!

  5. Write or Die!
    This is for those times when you just really cannot make words happen. It’s for those of you who need some rather… threatening circumstances to get you through writer’s block, and it does its job quite well! I usually don’t need any incentive to write, but it’s super fun to just watch my score climb!

  6. Carrot To-Do
    Have you ever wanted an angry robot to yell at you for not completing items on your to-do list? There’s an app for that! I put all of my tasks into Carrot To-Do, (writing related or otherwise), and I’ve actually been a lot more productive since I bought the app. There’s just something about an angry robot screaming at you that makes you wanna do stuff so she’ll shut up and let you gain a level so you can unlock another function of the app…

  7. Due
    This app lets you create reminders and preset timers. I haven’t used the reminder feature much because I always either yell at Siri to make my reminders or feed them to Carrot, but the preset timer thing is awesome! I do a lot of word sprints, and I also use the Pomodoro method, so that means I set a lot of timers! I don’t always wanna yell at Siri to set a timer, and the little flicky time picker thingy in the IOS clock app gets real old when you change the time length 20 times in a given day, so having a list of timers set for various lengths of time that I can just tap to start is super nice! Also, it has cool sounds!!!

  8. Voice Dream Reader
    This is a text to speech app that was originally developed for the blind and dyslexic. Basically you can give it almost any document, hit play, and it’ll read it in a really good sounding computerized voice. You can also buy several other high quality voices, and some of them make your documents sound almost like a real audio book! I’ve used Voice Dream to read eBooks and convert stuff to blind friendly formats for a while, but I recently got the idea to use it to play some of my writing. I’m currently editing my “shaman novel,” and listening to it with Voice Dream Reader has helped me pick out some rough places, so I thought I’d include it on this list.

  9. Nature Space
    So maybe this isn’t directly related to writing, but I’m the kind of writer who cannot write in silence. When I just need a little background noise, this is my go-to app. It has a ton of super realistic sounding nature sounds, so I can slip on my noise canceling headphones, turn on some ocean waves, and write away!

  10. Spotify
    This isn’t directly writing related either, but I always make a playlist for the plot and characters of whatever I’m working on. I use Spotify to do it because it’s super easy to use, I don’t have to pay $1.29 a song, and it even shows me related content so I can find songs that I myself might never listen to but that fit my characters perfectly!


That concludes my top ten writerly apps! I hope y’all found this helpful, and feel free to ask me any questions about any of these! Also, tell me about your favorite writerly apps in the comments!

Beautiful Books 2017 Writing Goals

Beautiful Books is a writing link up created by Cait @ Paper Fury. Click here for instructions and links to other Beautiful Books blog posts.


  1. What were your writing achievements last year?
    I finished the first draft of my NaNoWriMo novel!!!!!!! And now I get to edit it….

  2. What’s on your writerly “to-do list” for 2017?
    ◦Edit this mess of a thing I’m calling a novel.
    ◦Have it ready for beta readers by June.
    ◦Start writing the next book in the series for NaNoWriMo. I really would like to start that in July, but July is going to be crazy busy for me it seems!

  3. Tell us about your top-priority writing projects for this year!
    My absolute top priority project is the “shaman novel” that I wrote for NaNo and have already written a lot about. I’m now referring to it as the “shaman novel” because it’s gone through numerous title changes, and I don’t want to confuse you guys as much as I’ve confused myself. The plot is a total complete mess right now because writing the thing in order the first time would’ve made too much sense, so here’s some basic info that you can apply to the whole book!
    ◦It centers around a bunch of corrupted politicians who call themselves “The High Council.” They pretty much rule the world, and if you’re not royal, you are less than nothing to society.
    ◦Naturally there has to be a “lower class,” and they are the shamans. They practice a different kind of magic than all the royals, and they are very much looked down upon.
    ◦There are various practices of magic in my story world, but the ones that come up the most in this book are natural magic, blood magic, and academic magic.

  4. How do you hope to improve as a writer? Where do you see yourself at the end of 2017?
    This’ll be my first experience editing a project on this scale and sending it out to beta readers that aren’t just friends or family. My end goal for this year is to be querying for publication, so I’m sure I’ll learn a lot and improve my writing in several different ways.

  5. Describe your general editing process.
    Well… Umm… Yeah… Ok… So… Maybe I don’t have a process right now??? I messed up the timeline of this story SO horrifically that I’m still moving index cards around to figure out the order in which stuff needs to happen! After I’ve got my skeleton outline on a bulletin board, I’ll do a read through and put everything in order in Scrivener. After that??? I am seriously considering exporting it from Scrivener, brailling it, and putting it all in binders so I can slap sticky notes all over everything. The flaw in that plan is that I wrote a lot of words, and braille is bigger than print, so that would be a lot of paper, and I’d probably need like five giant binders…. We’ll see if that actually happens! If not, I guess I’ll just put it in a Word doc and leave myself a ton of comments, but oh how I hate using the comment thingy! I don’t know, ok?! Please describe your editing process in the comments below this post…

  6. On a scale of 1-10, how do you think this draft turned out?
    I’m going to put this at a solid 3… I think the story is great, but… See my answer to the previous question!

  7. What aspect of your draft needs the most work?
    Plot and structure! My character development is really good because I created the characters first and then worked the plot around them, but multiple POV characters and a little bit of a dual timeline made for an incoherent mess because my brain just doesn’t write things in order the first time apparently!

  8. What do you like the most about your draft?
    I love my characters! I can’t really explain why because spoilers, but they’re awesome, and I feel like they’re my friends now, and I really hope they’re as awesome as I think they are!

  9. What are your plans for this novel once you finish editing? More edits? Finding beta readers? Querying? Self-publishing? Hiding it in a dark hole forever?
    Beta readers, probably more edits, and hopefully querying by the end of the year!

  10. What’s your top piece of advice for those just finished writing a first draft?
    Are ya sure you want advice from me after reading this? Really?! Ok… If you’re gonna edit the thing, index cards, sticky notes, Scrivener, and coffee are your best friends!

The NaNoWriMo Tag

Hey writers and WriMos! I found the NaNoWriMo Tag through Natalia Leigh’s youTube channel, and she tagged everybody, so I thought I’d do my own! Here is Natalia’s tag video…

And here are my answers…

  1. How many times have you done NaNoWriMo, and how many times have you won NaNoWriMo?
    I did the NaNoWriMo Young Writers Program in November of 2015, and I hit my goal of 35000 words. I also did CampNaNo in April and July of 2016, and I hit both goals of 10000 words! So… Technically this is my fourth NaNo event, but my first real attempt at 50K.

  2. Are you a pantser or a plotter?
    I totally pantsed my first NaNoWriMo, and that story is now a project that we do not speak of anymore… Since then, I’ve become a hardcore plotter. Just check out this post about my outlining process if you’re not convinced.

  3. What was the name of the first novel you attempted during NaNoWriMo?
    That novel that we don’t speak of anymore was called “Circle Of Whispers.” It was a great idea, but the plot totally died around chapter ten, and since I didn’t outline at all, it was a giant mess that I just didn’t even want to attempt to fix and make readable by the end of NaNo. Maybe I’ll pick it back up one day, but for now it can just stay in that folder of stuff that I never look at on my desktop…

  4. Give us a one sentence summary of what you’re working on this NaNoWriMo.
    A group of teens reject their royal blood and magical heritage in order to follow the path of the shaman.

  5. What is the best writing advice you’ve ever been given?
    I read this quote somewhere, and somebody famous said it I think, but I cannot for the life of me remember who. Basically it said to write the story you would most want to read. I think this is really important because if you write the thing that you really, really, really, want to read, then somebody else is probably going to want to read it too. If you write something you don’t really want to read, then you’re not going to enjoy writing it, and therefore you won’t put your whole self into it. If you don’t put your whole self into it, then it probably isn’t going to be worth reading. Or at least it won’t be as good as something you were really excited to write.

  6. What is your biggest inspiration for figuring out what to write?
    I do not know… Each writing idea comes from something different, and none of them come from one set thing. My brain is a complex and confusing place, and it can take bits of inspiration from twelve different things, mix it all together, and come up with a brilliant, (or completely insane), story idea before i even know what’s happened. I usually pick a project based on how excited I am about it, because the story I’m most excited for is usually the one i have planned out the most, and therefore it’ll be easier to follow through.

  7. Read us the first sentence from one of your books.
    Here’s the current first sentence of my current project…
    His gaze is icy, cruel, and calculating as it sweeps over me, and I know exactly what he’s thinking: shaman boy.

  8. What do you plan to do with your manuscript after NaNoWriMo?
    I plan to edit this thing and publish it! I don’t know if publication will be soon, or if I’ll wait a few years, but it is going to be published one day. I’m thinking I might actually write the entire series so I can edit it all together though, because it needs to be really tightly woven together for it to work the way I want.

  9. Are you nervous for NaNo? Are you prepared?
    I am super nervous because I don’t know how this will work with my crazy school schedule, but I’m definitely more prepared this year than I have been in the past. The only thing I have to do to my outline is put it in order and get my Scrivener project all ready to go, and I think I can hopefully get that done this weekend.

  10. There is not a tenth question, and it is driving me batty, SO… What advice do you have for NaNo Newbies?
    Don’t stress over the word count thing. This is to challenge yourself and have fun, NOT to make you scream, cry, and pull your hair out because you can’t write 50000 words in a month on top of everything else you’re already doing. Don’t lose too much sleep, don’t neglect other priorities or things you really want to do. Just sit down, write as much as you can, and have fun in the process! Check out the forums, talk to other WriMos, make new writing friends, and give it the best shot you’ve got! If you win, awesome!!! If you don’t, it’s really no loss except you’ll have to tell your family and friends that you failed at your crazy attempt and hear them say “I told you so,” a billion times over… But that’s what headphones and a notebook are for! Block them out, (because their input doesn’t matter when it comes to your precious writing failure), and keep writing after NaNo is over. There are no NaNo police that say you can’t finish a project you started for NaNo in December. Of course, we all wanna hit that word count for bragging rights if nothing else, but the point is to have fun no matter what!

I Tag:

I can’t actually remember who is and isn’t doing NaNo, so if you’re a blogger doing NaNo and you read this post, then you are tagged!!! remember to leave a link in the comments so I can see your awesome answers!

How I Outline: (Yes, I Am A Crazy Person)

Guys! NaNoWriMo is happening in ONE WEEK! So… I am now writing a post about how I outline instead of finishing my outline… Yes, it’s counterproductive. Just go with it! This is the first time I’ve actually attempted to outline an entire novel. I used to be a hardcore pantser for the simple fact that having to outline analytical essays for school ruined me on the idea of outlining my own writing. And then the first year of NaNowriMo happened… I sat down on November 1st, typed out 35000 words, (a winning number since I did the YWP), and found out that my story had NO plot when I attempted to read back over it. That is now a project that we do not speak of, and it resides in the “stuff I don’t need now” folder on my desktop. If you’ve read this post, you know that this year’s NaNo project is majorly complicated and has a few different narrating characters, and after attempting to write a coherent synopsis, I decided that there was no way around it… I was gonna have to outline. I watched a ton of youtube videos about how different people outline, and I made my process based off of about ten different videos. It’s worked so far, (except for the small fact that I only have a week to put scenes in order and keep up with school work), so I thought I’d share it! *Note: My process for the book is very complex, requires lots of thought, has a few possibly redundant steps, and is going to make me look like the crazy person I am!

  1. Make a Dropbox folder for your project. I put it in Dropbox because it syncs like magic across my laptop, iPad, and phone, which means I can work on it discreetly at family functions if necessary! For now, the folder is just going to contain some notes in normal Word docs, but it’ll eventually contain my Scrivener project so I can still work in Scrivener on my IOS devices! If you didn’t already know, Scrivener got an IOS app, and it is possibly the best thing I’ve ever put on my iPad.
  2. Make a file called “Word Barf.” That IS the exact name of this document. Sound disgusting? It is. I pretty much just write down every single detail about my characters, the world, the setting, the plot, who has a blood fude with who and why, which royal families are allies and which will kill each other on sight, why this character is terrified of spiders, why another character never tells lies, a secret being kept from someone about a certain thing for what reason, and you get the picture… It is NOT a pretty file, and the next step is going to make you want to scream because it involves THAT file!
  3. Go through the “Word Barf” file and pick out every major plot event that could possibly actually happen in the story and isn’t just an insane thought that occurred at 4 AM! Yeah… That was fun… I should’ve probably just written down plot events in a different file as soon as I wrote them in the “Word Barf,” but that would’ve disrupted my brainstorm! They don’t have to be in order at this point, but just get all those good plot events separated out from the crazy!
  4. Look through the plot points and figure out where big wholes are. Then fill said big whole with other plot points. Note: This may be easier to do in the next step, but I didn’t think the first time.
  5. Write all those lovely plot points on index cards!!! Or… You could just print that file out and cut them up. 😉
  6. This is where the fun really begins! Start moving all those cards around until you get them in the perfect order! “But, Cheyenne,” you say, “I thought you loved Scrivener! Couldn’t you just do that in Scrivener?!” NO! Scrivener’s great for writing, but try dragging 107 scenes, (yes, I actually have that many), around on virtual index cards! It doesn’t work… Unless you’re reeeeeally good at remembering where stuff was when the screen scrolls down…
  7. Put the organized plot points on some sort of mostly permanent structure… I started out on a giant cork board, but it wasn’t big enough, so now they’re all taped to a trifold poster-board… Trust me… You’re gonna want to do this step because they WILL get shuffled around if you don’t, and then you will be very angry! Also, keep the cat/dog out of the room until you’ve got them stuck to something!
  8. Type all those plot points up in a new file, just in case something happens to the cards, or you just wanna work when you don’t have them. like at that family function I mentioned earlier!
  9. Put those typed plot points in your novel notebook, if you have such a notebook. This is one of those things that I said might be redundant since you have them typed already, but I’m the kind of person who has to have everything in a notebook even though it is stored digitally because I don’t like flipping between multiple files or programs.
  10. I told you I’m crazy! Put all of those plot points in Scrivener!!! I do all of my writing in Scrivener because I like to write by scene, and it is really handy to have the plot point for each scene nicely written in the notes section for each file so I know exactly what i’m going to write next. See! There is a method to my madness!!! You also need to put your character/setting/government info from the “Word Barf” in a Word doc, your notebook, and the character and research sections in Scrivener! Maybe those first two steps are redundant to some, but I gotta have a hard copy before it goes into Scrivener. My brain just won’t operate the other way! I was going to make the character and setting thing the next number, but then I wouldn’t have anything to go after it, and I also cannot stand to stop on an uneven number!!!

And There You Have It!

That is my outlining process simplified! NOT Feel free to adapt this process to suit you, and youTube “novel planning” if you think i’m completely crazy and that process makes you want to run far, far away from this blog… Please don’t run from me! I’m mostly harmless! I’d love to know how you outline in the comments, and feel free to link me to your blog if you’ve done a similar post. Also, are you ready for NaNo! Still planning? Have no idea what you’re even writing about? Let’s chat in comments! From Cheyenne 🙂